BMN Greenhouse Interior Finishing

Greenhouse-Interior-first-four-panels-installed-North
Greenhouse-Interior-first-four-panels-installed-North

Good Morning

Post Mothers Day blessing to everyone. I finished the day by making a couple odd little pizzas for the ladies.  The flat-bread came out kind of weird. The crust reminded me of  gram crackers.

Saturday, Nell and I installed insulation in the greenhouse. All I can say about that process, is of course thank you to Nell, and I’m glad it’s done.  As those of you who have blessed me by following the progress of the project know, this is more of a stream of consciousness design than a blueprinted project.

Greenhouse-Interior-insulation-not-pretty-but-finished
Greenhouse-Interior-insulation-not-pretty-but-finished

Somehow, I’ve yet to paint myself into any serious corners, although some minor design flaws have created  tricky situations for finish work. I must admit, I don’t often finish my projects. Whether it’s only in my head,  I usually feel  required to begin using what I build before getting around to putting the finishing touches on.

Happily, it does not appear that a lifetime of getting the basics up and running hasn’t completely absolved me of planning for a finished product. I’m nearing the time I’ve allotted for this project. I need to move on. Fortunately, this is a pretty damn cool part of the project, and it will, if successful provide up with years of pleasure and many pounds of year-round wholesome food. I’m also relieved and quite grateful my wife believes in me and my visions.

Greenhouse-Interior-first-panels-installed-North
Greenhouse-Interior-first-panels-installed-North

Above is the first panel. This went up fairly early in the day on Sunday. Perhaps you can see the long west facing shadows of the trees outside.

One of the tricky issues I’ve created by picking wood for a interior siding in the greenhouse is cutting the electrical outlets. It isn’t all that different than installing drywall, except drywall can be cut with a knife. Wood needs to be cut with saws. We bought another hole saw for the drill, this one is big enough to cut out the round lighting fixture boxes. However, using a hole saw to cut out space for those boxes means precision counts for 90% of the final grade. There is very little tolerance for error.

I’m still on the fence with what to do over the barn-wood wall. I’ve got to cover it, to seal it from spillage from the grow-beds which will be against them. Starting to build the grow-beds is what made me realize I couldn’t put off finishing the walls in the greenhouse any longer. One wall of the greenhouse is also one wall to the grow-beds.

Greenhouse-Interior-first-four-panels-installed-Northeast
Greenhouse-Interior-first-four-panels-installed-Northeast

I’m here to tell you, that top panel was rough on poor old me. I don’t even know if you can see from these crappy smartphone pictures what the real difficulty this panel presented. Anyway, I’ll point it out for you as I don’t know of any better means of dispelling my anxiety and after hours of work , displaying  pride in a job well done.

Anywho, it’s the top edge. That place where the eaves of the house jut into the greenhouse. Holy moley, that was some kind of test, and not really of my skill as a craftsmen, more a test of patience, memory and perseverance. You should see the scraps of paper with all the measurements, plotting precisely where I calculated each point is. I say memory, because even while I had written down the points, there were enough to tax my level of comprehension.

Between when I jotted the numbers on the drawing and ran out back to mark them on the panel, it was already beginning to blur together.   The first line I drew on the board was the ceiling angle which didn’t look right as soon as it went on. Back inside the greenhouse I measured it again, and found out I for unknown reasons wrote down 41.5″ instead of 31.5″? What the hell Brian, this was the first line? I got it wrong!

Damn! Well I can also tell you that stupid mistake  made me check and triple check every mark I made on that panel. Talk about time consuming and arduous. While it was only twenty feet between the table I was cutting the panels on outside and the wall, the panels were intended to fit on,  I made that trip too many times to count. I think my body remembers this morning though.

Greenhouse-Interior-seedling-trays
Greenhouse-Interior-seedling-trays

Meanwhile, thanks to Nell, we’re well on our way to having seeds started for the garden and  the aquaponics grow-beds.   Although as I water these seed-beds I smell fertilizer. I think there must be added fertilizer, even though we checked the labels of the potting soil and found nothing listed. We can not take any chances putting any fertilizer in the aquaponics.

I haven’t been regular with my newsletter as I’m sure my loyal readers know. I’m enjoying the extra time in the mornings, so I’ll probably keep this pace throughout the Summer. I’m still on what was described to me as temporary four days per week working for Desertgate. For this extra work, I am grateful. Working more days has afforded us the ability to do the things we need to do around the house as well as improving our living conditions.

In conclusion this morning, I’d have to say, yes it’s sad the frequency of the BMNs has suffered, but at the same time I have an extra hour or so in the mornings to get my head together to be the best tradesman I can be four days per week and this is a good thing.

I’ve got one doctor and one dentist appointment this week, so this’ll will be a time of take care of myself.

Feeling good, hope y’all are doing as well.

Brian Rodgers